Maureen Dowd Believes Mr Bush is Isolated

“W. Won’t Read This”
by Maureen Dowd

Never ask a guy who’s in a bubble if he’s in a bubble. He can’t answer.

‘Cause he’s in a bubble.

But the NBC anchor Brian Williams gamely gave it a shot, showing the president the Newsweek cover picturing him trapped in a bubble.

“This says you’re in a bubble,” Brian told W. “You have a very small circle of advisers now. Is that true? Do you feel in a bubble?”

“No, I don’t feel in a bubble,” Bubble Boy replied, unable to see the bubble because he’s in it. “I feel like I’m getting really good advice from very capable people and that people from all walks of life have informed me and informed those who advise me.” He added, “I’m very aware of what’s going on.”

He swiftly contradicted himself by admitting that “this is the first time I’m seeing this magazine” – his version of his dad’s Newsweek “Wimp Factor” cover – and that he doesn’t read newsmagazines.

The anchor and the anchorite spent a few anodyne moments probing the depths of what it’s like to be president. “I just talked to the president-elect of Honduras,” W. said. “A lot of my job is foreign policy, and I spend an enormous amount of time with leaders from other countries.”

Brian struggled to learn whether W. read anything except one-page memos. Talking about his mom, Bubble Boy returned to the idea of the bubble: “If I’m in a bubble, well, if there is such thing as a bubble, she’s the one who can penetrate it.”

“I’ll tell the guys at Newsweek,” the anchor said impishly.

“Is that who put the bubble story?” W. asked. First he didn’t know about it, and now he’s forgotten it already? That’s the alluring, memory-cleansing beauty of the bubble.

The idea that W. is getting good advice from very capable people is silly – administration officials have blown it on everything from the occupation and natural disasters to torture. In the bubble, they can torture while saying they don’t. They can pretend that Iraqi forces are stronger than they are. They can try to frighten people with talk of Al Qaeda’s dream of a new Islamic caliphate – their latest attempt to scare Americans into supporting the war they ginned up.

“Whether or not it needed to happen,” the president told the anchor, “I’m still convinced it needed to happen.” The Bubble Boy can even contradict himself and not notice.

W.’s contention that he’s informed by people from all walks of life is a joke, as is his wacky assertion that he can “reach out” to the public more than Abraham Lincoln because he has Air Force One. Lincoln actually went to the front in his war, with Minié balls whizzing by. No phony turkey for him.

The president may fly over all walks of life in Air Force One or drive by them and hide behind dark-tinted windows. In his bubble, he floats through a comforting world of doting women, respectful military audiences, loyal Republican donors and screened partisan groups – with protesters, Democrats, journalists, critics and coffins of dead soldiers kept at bay.

(He has probably even been shielded from the outrage of John and Stacey Holley, both Army veterans, who were shocked to learn that their only child, Matthew, killed in Iraq, would be arriving in San Diego as freight on a commercial airliner.)

Jack Murtha, a hawkish Democrat close to the Pentagon who supported both wars against Iraq waged by the Bushes, has been braying against the Bush isolation. He told Newsweek that a letter he wrote to the president making suggestions about how to fight the Iraq war was ignored for seven months, then brushed off by a deputy under secretary of defense. Even after he went public, he still did not get a call from the White House.

“If they talked to people,” he said, “they wouldn’t get these outbursts.”

Mr. Murtha told Rolling Stone that the administration’s deafness had doomed Iraq: “Everything we did was mishandled. Plans that the military and the State Department had in place – they ignored ‘em. The military tells me that when they were planning the invasion, the administration wouldn’t let one of the primary three-star generals in the room.”

The president’s bubble requires constant care. It’s not easy to keep out huge tragedies like Katrina, or flawed policies like Iraq. As Newsweek noted, a foreign diplomat “was startled when Secretary of State Rice warned him not to lay bad news on the president. ‘Don’t upset him,’ she said.”

Heaven forbid. Don’t burst his bubble.

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